Archive of Past Events of Premodern Interest


Archaeology Brown Bag Workshop
David Domenici, University of Bologna
Friday, April 28, 4:00pm
Brooks Hall 2nd floor conference room


   Cecilia d’Ercole, Anthropologie et Histoire des Mondes Antiques (ANHIMA)
“Craftsmanship in the Ancient City:  Strategies of Representation and Self-Representation”
Wednesday, April 26, 5:00pm
Rouss 403



Ancient History Presentations
Friday, April 21, 3:30-6:00pm
Nau Hall 342

Kevin Woram will present a first draft of his Master’s thesis:  “The Naupaktos Decree:  East Lokrians and Religious Community”
Tyler Creer will present his dissertation prospectus:  “The Historical Ramifications of Comparison between the Iliad and Heike Monogatari
Lily Van Diepen will present her dissertation prospectus:  “The Crimen Maiestatis and the Construction of Autocratic Rule, from Republic to Late Empire”

Tyler and Lily's Prospectuses may be downloaded HERE and HERE, respectively.

Refreshments provided.



McIntire Department of Art Faculty Research Colloquium
Fotini Kondyli, University of Virginia
“City Making & City Makers: Place-making and Community Building in Byzantine Athens”
Friday, April 21, 1:30-2:30pm
Fayerweather 206



Cecilia d’Ercole, Anthropologie et Histoire des Mondes Antiques (ANHIMA)
“Cultural Contacts in the Ancient Mediterranean:  the Case of the Pre-Roman Adriatic”
Wednesday, April 19, 5:00pm
Rouss 403


 



Sasha Knysh, University of Michigan and St. Petersburg State University, Russia
"A Clash of Islams: Sufism and Salafism in the Northern Caucasus" 
Friday, April 14,  12:00 - 1:30pm
NAU hall 211



   Cecilia d’Ercole, Anthropologie et Histoire des Mondes Antiques (ANHIMA)
“New Considerations on Greek Colonization”
Thursday, April 13, 5:00pm
Rouss 403

This month we welcome Professor Cecilia d’Ercole, Directrice d’études at EHESS in the area of “Échanges, interactions culturelles dans la Méditerranée ancienne.”  She is a specialist in ancient economic history and cultural exchange, with a particular interest in the archaic Adriatic.  She is the author of seven books, including three studies of amber in museum collections, a study of the ancient Adriatic entitled Importuosa Italiae litora. Paysage et échanges dans l’Adriatique méridionale archaïque (2002), and a history of Greek colonization, Histoires méditerranéennes. Aspects de la colonisation grecque en Occident et dans la Mer noire (VIIIe-IVe siècles av.J.-C. (2012).  She will be offering three public lectures, all in Rouss 403.



Sasha Knysh, University of Michigan and St. Petersburg State University, Russia
"Qur'anic Exegesis and Mystical Experience: Sufis and the Qur'an" 
Thursday, April 13,  2:30pm - 4:00pm
Minor Hall 125

Already during the first two centuries of Islam Muslim ascetics-mystics (Sufis) used  Qur'anic recitation as a means to extract its exoteric, allegorical senses. This exoteric reading of the Scripture would often result in a drastic transformation of the self of the exegete in what can be described as a fateful encounter between the Qur'anic matrix of ideas and his or her personal experiences and convictions. The presentation examines such exoteric-experiential uses of the Qur'an by Sufis by placing them in historical and comparative perspectives.

Please register here to join us for these free events.

Alexander Knysh is Professor of Islamic Studies at the University of Michigan and Principal Investigator of a research project on Islamic Studies at the St. Petersburg State University, Russia. His research interests include Islamic Mysticism (Sufism), Qur’anic Studies, the history of Muslim theological, philosophical and juridical thought and Islamic/Islamist movements in comparative perspective. He has numerous academic publications on these subjects, including nine books. Since 2006, he has served as section editor for “Sufism” on the Editorial Board of the Encyclopedia of Islam, Third Edition (E. J. Brill, Leiden and Boston). He is also Executive Editor of the Encyclopedia of Islamic Mysticism and the Handbook Series of Sufi Studies published by E.J. Brill, Leiden and Boston.



Premoderns Meeting and Open Greek and Latin Project Discussion
Dr. Gregory Crane, Tufts University
Thursday, April 13, 2:30pm
Fiske Kimball Fine Arts Library R-Lab
refreshments provided

Please join us for the UVA Library’s last Cultural Heritage Moment for the 2017 academic year.
 
Dr. Gregory Crane, Professor of Classics and Computer Science at Tufts University and Alexander von Humboldt Professor of Digital Humanities at Leipzig University, will be visiting the University of Virginia on Wednesday –Thursday, April 12-13 next week.  He will be participating in an open dialogue on Digital Humanities with Premodern faculty at UVA and talking about his newest digital endeavor, the Open Greek and Latin - First 1K Greek Project of which UVA is a partner. 



Dr. Gregory Crane, Tufts University
"Open Philology"
Wednesday, April 12, 3:00pm
Alderman 421
reception to follow

(http://www.dh.uni-leipzig.de/wo/gregory-crane/).



 Archaeology Brown Bag Workshop
Nikolas Papadimitriou, Museum of Cycladic Art, Athens Center for Hellenic Studies, Harvard University
"Craftsmanship in the Prehistoric Aegean:Investigating Technological Questions"
Friday, April 7, 4:00-5:15pm
Fayerweather Hall 215
 




Peter Van Dommelen, Brown University
"Connected Communities: Undocumented Migration and Material Practices in the West Mediterranean'"
Friday, April 7, 1:00 - 2:15pm 
Brooks Hall, 2nd Floor Conference Room
 



CAMWS - 113th Meeting
Wednesday-Saturday, April 5-8
Kitchener, Ontario

The Meeting Will Be Held In Kitchener, Ontario At The Invitation Of The University Of Waterloo. 
The Conference Hotel Will Be The Holiday Inn.



Stocker Lecture
David Levene, New York University
"Monumental Insignificance: The Absence of Roman Topography from Livy's Rome"
Tuesday, April 4, 5:00pm
Cocke Hall, Gibson Room

Professor Levene is Chair of the Department of Classics at New York University and an expert in Latin prose literature (especially historiography and rhetoric), Roman religion, and the history of the Roman Republic. Among his awards are a Leverhulme Trust Major Research Fellowship (2004-2006), a Visiting Fellowship at All Souls College, Oxford (2013), and the R.D. Milns Visiting Professorship at the University of Queensland (2015). He has written two books on Livy: Religion in Livy (Leiden, 1993), and Livy on the Hannibalic War (Oxford, 2010); his current major project is an edition of, and commentary on, Livy's fragments and epitome.
 



 
Classics Graduate Conference 
"Gender in Antiquity: Anxieties, Transgressions, and Legacies"
Saturday, April 1
Morning talks from 9:30am in Cocke Hall, Gibson Room
Afternoon talks from 2:00pm in Minor Hall 125





Archaeology Brown Bag Workshop
Leslie Preston Day, Wabash College
"Burial, Landscape, and Memory in Early Iron Age Kavousi, Crete"
Friday, March 31, 4:00pm
Fayerweather Hall, room 215



 

 Joseph Day, Wabash College
“Elegy into Epigram: Why Elegiac Meter Became Dominant in Archaic Inscribed Epigram.”
Thursday, March 30, 5:00pm
Cocke Hall, Gibson Room
reception to follow


 Erika Damer, University of Richmond
Margaret Lowe Undergraduate Lecture
“The Limits of Vision: Duplicitous Bodies and Bad Faith in the Amores"
Tuesday, March 28, 5:00pm
Cocke Hall, Gibson Room
reception to follow
 



Jeremy A. Sabloff
"Beyond Ancient Maya Temples, Palaces, and Tombs: How Maya Archaeologists Discovered the 99% Through the Study of Pre-Columbian Settlement Patterns"
Monday, March 27, 5:00pm
Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library auditorium
reception to Follow

Current scholarly understandings of Pre-Columbian Maya civilization are quite different from the traditional model of ancient Maya civilization that dominated the field of Maya studies until recently and still dominates public perception of the ancient Maya. In part, this new view is due to both the significant increase in archaeological studies in the Maya area in the past few decades and the decipherment of Maya hieroglyphic texts, which have provided new insights into Maya history. However, much of the change is due to the introduction and rapid spread of settlement pattern studies more than a half a century ago. This lecture examines the major impact of the methodology of settlement pattern research on Maya archaeology and how such studies have moved archaeological studies away from their concentration on the ruling elites to a broader, more realistic approach that looks at elites and commoners alike.

Jeremy Sabloff is Christopher H. Browne Distinguished Professor of Anthropology, Emeritus, and former director of the University of Pennsylvania Museum (1994-2004). An archaeologist, he recently retired as president of the Santa Fe Institute, where he continues as a member of the external faculty. He has written or edited 21 books and monographs on ancient Maya civilization, the rise of complex societies and cities, the history of archaeology, and the relevance of archaeology in the modern world. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Philosophical Society, as well as a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the Society of Antiquaries (London). The Society for American Archaeology honored him with its Lifetime Achievement Award, and he is a recipient of the University of Pennsylvania Museum’s Lucy Wharton Drexel Medal.



 
 
Obear Chair Inaugural Talk
Ivana Petrovic, University of Virginia
"Bound Divinities in the Homeric Hymns"
Thursday, March 23, 5:00pm
Gibson Room, Cocke Hall



 Fralin Lunchtime Talk
Thomas Winters, University of Virginia
"Imagining Antiquity: Italianate Prints from the Langhorne Collection"
Tuesday, March 21, 12:00pm
Fralin Museum

The eighteenth century, coincident with what is often termed the Age of Enlightenment, was a period of European history that witnessed a resurgence of an interest in antiquity, specifically in the culture of classical Rome. Wealthy, well-educated citizens of the European upper classes often cultivated their erudition by taking the Grand Tour, a journey that introduced them to the localities and to the antiquities of the Roman Empire. In the middle of the century, discoveries unearthed in the newly excavated sites of Pompeii and Herculaneum also stimulated fresh and keen interest in classical culture.

Naturally, the classical revival of the eighteenth-century impacted the realm of artistic production with the European societies that experienced it. This exhibition, which showcases a collection of prints recently gifted to the Museum and now on public display for the first time, explores a range of artistic responses to this cultural phenomenon, from the depiction of both contemporary and historical landscapes, to Neoclassical visualizations of ancient mythologies and historical events, to images that speak to the rise of antiquarianism.
 
Image: William Pether, British, ca. 1738–1821. After Joseph Wright of Derby, British, 1734–1797. The Persons Viewing the Gladiator by Lamplight, 1769. Mezzotint. 17 1/2 x 22 1/8 in (44.5 x 56.2 cm). 
Lent by the Langhorne Collection, 2014.EL.1.89.



 
 AIA Kress Lecture
Bjorn Loven, University of Copenhagen
“A Tale of Two Sunken Harbour Cities – The Harbours of Ancient Athens and Corinth”
Monday, March 13, 5:00pm
Campbell 158 

In ancient times as today, the sea served as a medium for cultures to connect with a wider world through trade, colonization, and military conquest. Perhaps nowhere was the sea used more effectively than in the ancient Greek world. In the mountainous, peninsular and island-strewn regions of Greek civilization, the vast majority of trade, communication and exchange of knowledge took place on the seas, in anchorages, and in harbour areas. Ancient harbour settlements evolved into focal points of human interaction and served as umbilical cords, as it were, to the mainland. Early in their development, harbours evolved along complex lines, their design determined by their function, with some serving solely as commercial harbours, others as a place where both merchant ships and navies sought shelter. Some harbours were developed solely for military use. This lecture will explore the archaeology and history of two very different ancient harbour types – focusing on the commercial areas of Lechaion, the main harbour of ancient Corinth, and the Zea and Mounichia Harbours, which were developed to house the Athenian navy. These harbours have been the focus of the speaker’s research (Lechaion Harbour Project, 2013–, and the Zea Harbour Project, 2002–2012).   
 
The Lechaion Harbour Project is a collaboration between the Ephorate of Underwater Antiquities under the Greek Ministry of Culture and Sports, the SAXO-Institute, the University of Copenhagen, and the Danish Institute at Athens under the Danish Ministry of Education. It is directed by Dr. Dimitris Kourkoumelis of the Ephorate of Underwater Antiquities and Dr. Bjørn Lovén. The Augustinus Foundation and the Carlsberg Foundation finance the project.
 
The Zea Harbour Project is a collaboration between the Ephorate of Underwater Antiquities, and the Ephorate of West Attica, Piraeus and Islands (both under the Greek Ministry of Culture and Sports), the SAXO-Institute, the University of Copenhagen, and the Danish Institute at Athens under the Danish Ministry of Education. It is directed by Dr. Bjørn Lovén. The Carlsberg Foundation finances the project.
 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JavWHxdJ_FI
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9O4TDO587Wc
Publications: http://saxoinstitute.ku.dk/staff/?pure=en%2Fpersons%2Fbjoern-loven(d281dfe6-78c6-4cef-8d8e-f13a3d00608d)%2Fpublications.html




Tuesday Classics Luncheon
Tuesday, February 28, lunch at 12:30, talk at 1:00, and adjournment at 1:45
Room E1 of the Garden Room


 
 
Gildersleeve candidate
Anthony Corbeill, University of Kansas
Lecture: "An Attack on Cicero: What the Etrus​​cans really meant"
Friday, February 24, 4:00pm
Rousse 256



Gildersleeve candidate
Anthony Corbeill, University of Kansas
Seminar: "Creating Memories of Plautus in Roman Antiquity"
Thursday, February 23, 3:30pm
Gibson Room, Cocke Hall
 


Archaeology Brown Bag Workshop
Claire Weiss, Univeristy of Virginia
"The Facade of Frontages at Ostia"
Friday, February 24, 4:00pm
Brooks Hall 2nd floor conference room

Ostia presents one of the largest areas of exposed ruins in Italy, making available an extensive, contiguous expanse of Roman urban construction. The city is often lumped together with Pompeii and Herculaneum as one of the handful of well-preserved Roman cities to which scholarship has returned time and again as a source of incomparably complete data. This is a misperception. The example set by the Vesuvian cities, their appearance very similar to that at the moment of their destruction in A.D. 79, has distorted the conceptualization of, approach to, and resulting discussion surrounding Ostia. This paper presents the results of a city-wide frontage and street survey conducted at Ostia in 2014 and 2016, proposing an identification of the portions of the streets that have been disturbed and re-laid, as well as the portions of the streets and sidewalks that are preserved in their original aspect. Without accounting for the degree of reconstruction, conclusions about urban activity at Ostia will remain as fanciful as the structures on which they are based.


 
Dr. Filippos Tsimpoglou, Director General of the National Library of Greece
"The National Library of Greece: Three challenges"
Thursday, February 23, 3:00pm
Auditorium of the Harrison Small Library
reception to follow
 
Dr. Tsimpoglou will be joining us for a lunch with the PreModerns@UVA and other faculty on Friday, Feb. 24 from 12:00pm -2:00pm.  Please RSVP to Ruth Dillon (rdd6h@virginia.edu) so we can determine the food.
 


 
 
McIntire Lecture
Jennifer Neils, Case Western Reserve University
"From Praxiteles to Caravaggio: The Apollo Sauroktonos Redefined"
Thursday, February 23, 6:30pm
Campbell Hall 160

Jenifer Neils, formerly the Elsie B. Smith Professor in the Liberal Arts in the Department of Classics at Case Western Reserve University, recently succeeded James Wright as the next Director of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens, beginning a 5-year appointment in July 2017. An internationally renowned scholar in classics and art history, Prof. Neils has taught for four decades, published prolifically, excavated in Greece and Italy, and recently won the first Baker-Nord Center Award for Distinguished Scholarship in the Humanities. Her work on the Parthenon has earned her the reputation of being one of the world’s most established authorities on the monument. 



Tuesday Classics Luncheon
Tuesday, February 21, lunch at 12:30, talk at 1:00, and adjournment at 1:45
Room E1 of the Garden Room



Gildersleeve candidate
Christopher Krebs, Stanford University
Seminar: "Audacia in Translationibus?  Thoughts on Sallust (and Cicero), the TLL (and the OLD)"
Friday, February 17, 3:30-5:00pm
Lower West Oval Meeting Room, Rotunda

For this seminar, please read this paper, and follow this assignment.




Gildersleeve candidate
Christopher Krebs, Stanford University
"Caesar's Intellectual Companions. Plato, Hipparchus, and other unusual Suspects"
Thursday, February 16, 5:00pm
Rouss 403
 



Tuesday Classics Luncheon
Tuesday, February 14, lunch at 12:30, talk at 1:00, and adjournment at 1:45
Room E1 of the Garden Room


 
 
Ellen Bayard Weedon Lectures in the Arts of Asia
Ruth Barnes, Yale University Art Gallery
"Indian Textiles for the Lands Below the Winds: The Trade with Southeast Asia"
Thursday, February 9, 6:00pm
Campbell 153



Tuesday Classics Luncheon
Tuesday, February 7, lunch at 12:30, talk at 1:00, and adjournment at 1:45
Room E1 of the Garden Room



McIntire Department of Art Faculty Research Colloquium
Dorothy Wong, University of Virginia
"Imperial Cities as Capitals of Buddhist Empires, ca. 650–770”
Friday, February 3, 2:00-3:00pm
Fayerweather 215


 
Medieval Studies Lecture Series
Candace Barrington, Central Connecticut State University 
Jonathan Hsy, George Washington University
“Linguistic and Cultural Hospitality”
Friday, February 3,  
11:00am-12:00pm, followed by lunch  
Mount Vernon Room, Alderman 224C
Please RSVP to DeVan Ard (dda8xx@virginia.edu)
 
The workshop on Friday morning, "Linguistic and Cultural Hospitality," will discuss what they have learned by engaging comparative translations as well as modern-day adaptations and performances of a dominant culture's canonical text. If you’d like to attend the workshop, please RSVP to DeVan Ard (dda8xx@virginia.edu).
 



Medieval Studies Lecture Series
Candace Barrington, Central Connecticut State University 
Jonathan Hsy, George Washington University
"Digital Hospitality"
Thursday, February 2, 2:00pm 
Alderman 421
 
On Thursday afternoon in the Scholars' Lab, Professors Barrington and Hsy will give a presentation entitled "Digital Hospitality" that outlines some basic principles of archive and database creation that have been integral to the way Global Chaucers, with its international collective of scholars, translators, and enthusiasts, has taken shape. 



Tuesday Classics Luncheon
Tony Woodman, University of Virginia
"A Classical Education?"
Tuesday, January 31, lunch at 12:30, talk at 1:00, and adjournment at 1:45
Room E1 of the Garden Room



Archaeology Brown Bag Lecture
Kristina Douglass, National Museum of Natural History
"Late Holocene Resource Exploitation and Settlement in the Velondriake Marine Protected Area, Southwest Madagascar"
Friday, January 27, 4:00pm
Brooks Hall 2nd floor conference room



 Symposium In Honor of Jenny Strauss Clay,
University of Virginia

Saturday, November 19, 10:00am
Gibson Room, Cocke Hall

10:00 Gathering and Coffee
10:25 Welcome: K. Sara Myers
10:30–11:15 Christopher Nappa, presiding Anatole Mori, ‘What the Cyclops Saw: Self-Knowledge in Theocritus’ Idylls 6 and 11’
11:15–12:00 Daniel Holmes, presiding Benjamin Jasnow, ‘Theocritus and Cavafy’

12:00–2:00 Break for lunch
2:00–2:45 Daniel Barber, presiding Blanche Conger McCune, ‘Love Bites: Horace and the Violence of Venus’
2:45–3:30 Tim Brelinski, presiding Courtney Evans, ‘Horace Ars Poetica 172, a Cavalier Defense’

3:30–3:45 Break
3:45–4:30 Diane Arnson Svarlien, presiding Daniel Mendelsohn, ‘Reflections on (a) Mentor: An Appreciation of Jenny Strauss Clay’

4:30–6:30 Reception in the Solarium of the Colonnade Club, Pavilion VII, West Lawn
 


 

Weedon Lecture in the Arts of Asia
Beth McKillop, Victoria and Albert Museum, London

"Korean Ceramics in the International Nexus: The Victoria and Albert Museum's New Ceramics Galleries"
Thursday, November 17, 6:00pm
Campbell Hall 153

In 2010 Victoria and Albert Museum in London reopened its peerless international collection of over 60,000 ceramics with a radical new re-display, replacing regimented rows of wooden cabinets with a lively, varied sequence of themed exhibition spaces. McKillop introduces the curatorial and visitor research that shaped the new galleries, and considers the place of ceramics from Korea in their narratives and designs.



Annabel Wharton, Duke University
Public Workshop: Renaissance Blindfold
Thursday, November 17, 11:30am - 1:00pm 
with lunch directly after, no RSVP necessary
Alderman 423
 
Dr. Wharton will also run a workshop for the general public. She writes, “We will do with images what should be done on site: investigate a building. In the process we may begin to understand how assumptions involved in periodization (in this instance ‘Renaissance’) act as blinders, limiting what we see.” 


 
Annabel Wharton, Duke University
Lecture: “Models’ Acts: Analog to Digital”
Wednesday, November 16, 6:30-8:00 pm
Alderman 421

From mathematical models to supermodels, models are ubiquitous. Models’ utility and authority are much discussed in the sciences and social sciences. But with a few notable exceptions, models have been under-investigated in architecture and in the humanities more generally. Professor Wharton probes several architectural models in order to reveal the sources of models’ autonomy and agency. She posits that the lessons learned from the acts of these scale models are applicable to all other models, from economic pie charts to algorithms. A better understanding of architectural models might even prove useful to mathematicians and biologists.
 


 
 
Jennifer Ingleheart, Durham University
"Vates Lesbia: Images of Sappho in the poetry of Ovid"
Wednesday, November 16, 5:00pm
Gibson Room, Cocke Hall


MedColl Workshop
Annabel Wharton, Duke University
"Architectural Agents: Museums and Spolia"
Wednesday, November 16, 11:30am - 1:00pm
followed by lunch from 1:00-2:00     
Mount Vernon Room, Alderman 224C
please RVSP to Justin Greenlee (jgg3mb@virginia.edu)

Dr. Wharton begins her visit with a MedColl workshop. In preparation, we will read Chapter 2 of her recent book Architectural Agents (Minnesota, 2015, here) (.pdfs are posted to the MedColl Collab site and attached to this email). Dr. Wharton provided this synopsis: “Part I of Architectural Agents considers forms of physical violence perpetrated by museums. A museum appears to be the most benign of buildings—its cultural benefits are certainly broadly acknowledged. Visitors are aware of what a museum brings to a culture, but tend to overlook what it has taken away. To redress this omission, I examine the Palestine Archaeological Museum in Jerusalem. The Jerusalem museum is a grand, Orientalizing, beaux-arts structure, magnificently located near Damascus Gate overlooking the Old City and the Mount of Olives. Like many great archaeological museums, it is a product of imperialism and a showcase of the effects of empire. Built during the British Mandate, its collections came to include the world’s largest archive of Dead Sea Scrolls. Now the museum itself is the object of conquest. Rendered comatose, the museum is eviscerated; its precious contents are a form of modern spolia. Spolia is now usually deployed as a benign art-historical term for the reuse of architectural fragments. It has lost its Classical reference to the plunder taken from a slaughtered enemy’s body. This chapter reminds its readers of a fact that the ancients never forgot: the public spectacle of spolia demands death. In the early twenty-first century, the denuded corpses are emptied buildings.”



 
 Beth McKillop, Victoria and Albert Museum, London
"Korea: Confucians, Buddhists, and their Books"
Monday, November 14, 5:30 p.m.
Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Auditorium

Korea is a country with a remarkable book and literary history. Known in today’s world as a divided land, Korea has long been a country that revered the written word. Chinese characters and culture shaped much of traditional Korea’s education system, but the distinctive, continuous life of the book in Korea was shaped by historical events and movements that stretched far beyond China. Duplicating texts has been an important part of Buddhist practice in Korea for almost two millennia. Books were printed on paper from the earliest times, and important experiments with bronze cast types supplemented the dominant technology of woodblock printing. Every aspect of Korean book history has a material and physical dimension that illuminates the story of Korea’s past. From the preparation of woodblocks by soaking the planks in sea water before carving the texts on to them in mirror writing, to the simple methods used to produce soot ink, to the lavish gold and silver illuminated holy texts of the royal Buddhist scriptorium, books from the Koryo (918–1392) and Choson (1392–1910) dynasties bear witness to two great traditions that enriched indigenous Korean belief systems. The teachings of the Chinese philosopher Confucius (551–479 BCE) were studied in academies known as sowon, all around the country. They formed the curriculum for the national examination system—the ladder of success in pre-modern Korea. Buddhist scriptures reached Korea after traveling eastwards through China. Reverence for the Buddha, evidenced by careful study of his teachings, has persisted until modern times.

The illustrated lecture will use books in major Western collections, particularly the British Library and the Wellcome Library, London, to introduce the remarkable bibliographic and publishing achievements of the Korean past.


PreModerns Meeting
Friday, November 11, 1:00pm
Fiske Kimball Fine Arts Library Faculty Research Lab

Two informal and very brief -10 minute- presentations will start out the meeting.

1.  Fotini Kondyli: Looking at spolia in Late Byzantine structures to forge a pan-Byzantine past and reunite previously lost territories with the Byzantine Empire and its capital, Constantinople. 


2. Amanda Phillips: Ottoman textiles and how they  deviate from all kinds of official regulation about them.

For this talk, please read chapter 7 from Suraiya Faroqui's book (click to download):  


 

Workshop on Religion and Society
in Greco-Roman Antiquity
Jodi Magness, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

Seminar: "More than Just Filth:The Impurity of Excrement in Biblical and Early Jewish Traditions"
Friday, November 4, 12:00–1:30pm
Newcomb 177



 
Workshop on Religion and Society
in Greco-Roman Antiquity
Jodi Magness, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Lecture: "Samson in Stone:New Discoveries in the Ancient Synagogue at Huqoq in Israel's Galilee"
Thursday, November 3, 5:00pm
Campbell Hall 153
 




 
 Dimitri Kastritsis, University of St Andrews
"The Alexander Romance and the Ottoman Imperial Project"
Thursday, November 3, 4:00pm
Nau Hall 342


During the period that saw the creation of the Ottoman Empire in place of Byzantium, the late medieval Balkans, and the post-Mongol ‘lands of Rum,’ the Alexander of pseudo-Callisthenes functioned as familiar if contested cultural currency. Across the boundaries of Christianity and Islam, legends about the ancient conqueror took on new relevance in light of contemporary political aspirations. Familiar stories were closely intertwined with the religious and political turmoil of the time, as well as eschatological expectations. This presentation is a brief look at the fate of the Alexander Romance, both Greek and Islamic, in the fifteenth-century Ottoman world. Dimitri J. Kastritsis is Lecturer in History at the University of St Andrews. His publications include The Sons of Bayezid (Brill, 2007), two articles on the Alexander Romance in the Ottoman fifteenth century, and a forthcoming annotated translation of the Oxford Anonymous Ottoman History (Bodleian Marsh 313). He is currently working on a monograph about the early Ottoman imperial project and its representation.



East Asia Center Lecture Series
Robert Borgen, University of California at Davis
"Wutaishan/Godaisan: A Chinese Holy Mountain and Early Japanese Buddhism"
Tuesday, November 1, 3:15 - 5:00pm
Monroe Hall, Room 124



Archaeology Brownbag Workshop
Susan Palazzo, Department of Anthropology, University of Virginia
"Understanding the Colonial Process through Changing Foodways in Bronze and Iron Age Sardinia"
AND
Justin Mann, Program in Classical Art and Archaeology, University of Virginia
"Porcelain & Power: The Archaeological Landscape of Coffee, Ritual, and Status in Rural Cyprus" 
Friday, October 28, 4:00 - 5:30pm


 
Constantine Lecture
Andrew Ford, Princeton University
“Linus: The Story of Greek Lyric Genres”
Friday, October 28, 5:00pm
Gibson Room, Cocke Hall

 


 AIA Lecture Series
Erin W Averett, Creighton University
"Playing the Part: Masks and the Performance of Identity in Iron Age Cyprus"
Wednesday, October 26, 5:00 PM
Campbell 158 

Masks of a variety of types were used in the ancient Mediterranean for a variety of purposes, from ritual performances to theatrical plays. The island of Cyprus is well known for its abundance of masks depicting primarily bulls and bearded males. Although these distinct masks have been the subject of focused studies as well as broader investigations on Phoenician and Punic masks, there has been no comprehensive and diachronic overview of this important corpus contextualized within its Cypriot setting. This talk reevaluates the evidence for masking rituals in Late Bronze Age and Iron Age Cyprus through close analysis of archaeological contexts to reconstruct masked performances. Although many of the masks reveal similarities to Levantine examples, the present evidence suggests a dynamic interplay of local and foreign customs between the two regions. The richness of masks on Cyprus, however, underscores the long tradition of masking on the island and allows us to reconstruct partially the social and religious significance of masking ceremonies. At the end of the Bronze Age through the era of the autonomous city-kingdoms, masks likely functioned as symbolic objects used in constructing social identities and can be associated with restricted groups, likely even the kings, practicing rituals at key sanctuaries. This link between masking rituals and the kingdoms becomes more apparent when the evidence for masks abruptly comes to an end in the late fourth century. Masking rituals flourished with the royal kingdoms and appear to have dramatically ended with the incorporation of Cyprus into the Ptolemaic kingdom. In the Hellenistic and Roman periods, a different mask tradition related to the Greek theater appears on the island.



Archaeology Brownbag Workshop
Amanda Sharp, Classical Archaeology, University of Oxford
"Figured Capitals and Roman Archaeology: Where, When and Why"
Friday, October 21, 4:00 - 5:30pm






McIntire Lecture Series
Mimi Yiegpruksawan, Yale University
"Countdown to Julian Year 1052: Some Thoughts on Art and the Periodization of the Buddhist Eschaton in Heian and Liao"
Thursday, October 20, 6:30pm
Campbell Hall, Room 160


Tuesday Classics Luncheon
Tuesday, October 18, lunch at 12:30, talk at 1:00, and adjournment at 1:45
Room E1 of the Garden Room



Tuesday Classics Luncheon
Tuesday, October 11, lunch at 12:30, talk at 1:00, and adjournment at 1:45
Room E1 of the Garden Room



The 2016 Randolph College Greek Play, Aristophanes “The Frogs” 
October 7 (4pm), 8 (1pm), 9 (4pm) 
Mabel K. Whiteside Greek Theatre (The Dell)
Randolph College, Lynchburg, Virginia
FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC 
(rain location: Houston Memorial Chapel) 
No tickets are required



 
East Asia Center Lecture Series
Vincent Leung, University of Pittsburgh
"Specter of the Past: Remembrance and Amnesia Under the Rise of the Qin Empire"
Friday, October 7, 3:15 - 5:00pm
Monroe Hall, Room 124
 




Zara Torlone, Miami University
"The Joy of Exile: Ovid in Pushkin’s, Mandelshtam’s, and Brodsky’s Poetry” 
Thursday, October 6, 5:00pm
130 Monroe Hall



The Fate of Rome's fatum - Conference 
 Saturday, October 1, 9:00am - 6:00pm 
Gibson Room, Cocke Hall 

Program 
9.15-9.30 Welcome and Introduction, Anke Walter 
 9.30-10.15 Poetic Prophecies and the Rise of Rome in the 2nd c. BCE, Charles McNelis 
 10.15-11.00 Poetry and Fate in Roman epic, Lily Panoussi 
 – coffee break – 
 11.15-12.00 Vergil’s Rome in Ovid’s Metamorphoses, Sara Myers 
 – lunch – 
 2.00-2.45 Rome’s fatum in Ovid’s Fasti, Anke Walter 
 2.45-3.30 Fate and Astrology in Tacitus' Annals, Kelly Shannon 
 – coffee break – 
 3.45-4.30 Reconciling fate(s) and Rome(s), Caroline Stark 
 – reception – 

The conference is kindly supported by the American Friends of the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation and the Department of Classics of UVa. Conference venue is the Gibson Room in Cocke Hall. 
The workshop is free and open to the public. Guests are very welcome! 

 For further information, please email Anke Walter (aw5at@virginia.edu).

 



PreModerns meeting 
Thursday, September 29, 6:00 - 7:30pm 
Faculty R-Lab (formerly Bar and Lounge) Fiske Kimball Fine Arts Library

“Meet & Greet” - bring a buddy and encourage more graduate students to join us.  We will talk about the new Faculty Research Lab, plans for the year and welcome back those who were on sabbatical.



Tuesday Classics Luncheon
Tuesday, September 27, lunch at 12:30, talk at 1:00, and adjournment at 1:45
Room E1 of the Garden Room



Tuesday Classics Luncheon
Tuesday, September 20, lunch at 12:30, talk at 1:00, and adjournment at 1:45
Room E1 of the Garden Room



CAV - Classical Association of Virginia
Saturday, September 17, 8:00am - 5:00pm
Monroe 130



Tuesday Classics Luncheon
Jenny Clay
Tuesday, September 13, lunch at 12:30, talk at 1:00, and adjournment at 1:45
Room E1 of the Garden Room



Archaeology Brown-Bag Workshop
Sarah Tyler Brooks, James Madison University
"Byzantine Buildings and Legacy Archaeology in Ottoman Istanbul: Sculptural Appropriation at the Kalenderhane Camii and Kariye Camii"
Friday, September 9, 4:00pm
Brooks Hall 2nd floor conference room
light refreshments provided


 
Wolfgang Bernard, 
University of Rostock 
"Aristotle's De Anima
The Soul as the Principle Enabling Us to Make Distinctions" 
Wednesday, August 31, 5:00pm
Gibson Room, Cocke Hall



Medieval Textualities: A Symposium
Friday, May 6, 10:30am - 6:00pm
Commonwealth Room, Newcomb Hall

They symposium is in honor of Anthony Spearing on the occasion of his retirement.



   
Martien A. Halvorson-Taylor, University of Virginia
"Love in the Ancient World: A Critical Look at Song of Songs in the Hebrew Bible"
Tuesday, May 3,  12:00pm
Virginia Foundation for the Humanities Conference Center
145 Ednam Drive

In the Bible, which has surprisingly little to say about human love and even less to say about passion and sexual desire, the Song of Songs is an unusual book. God is not explicitly mentioned and the book is filled with expressions of human love, not to mention overtly sexual metaphors, that make it seem something of an interloper.  In this talk, we will explore how the Song of Songs' use of love language makes it distinct from much of the rest of the Hebrew Bible, what it can tell us about love in the ancient world, and why this matters.




Stocker Lecture
Katharina Volk, Columbia University
"The Importance of Being Cato: Engaged Philosophy in the Late Republic"
Thursday, April 21, 5:00pm
Gibson Room, Cocke Hall




Leslie Brubaker, University of Birmingham
"Teenagers of Byzantium"
Wednesday, April 20, 6:30pm
Campbell 160



Classics Graduate Student Conference
University of Virginia 
Saturday, April 16


 
Workshop on Religion and Society in Greco-Roman Antiquity 
David Frankfurter, Boston University
Seminar "Martyrology and the Prurient Gaze" 
Tuesday, April 12, 11:00am-12:30pm
Newcomb 389

Article under discussion available HERE.
 



   

Workshop on Religion and Soiety in Greco-Roman Antiquity
David Frankfurter, Boston University
Lecture: "A Site of Blessings, Dreams, and Wonders: The Egyptian Saint’s Shrine as Crucible of Christianization"
Monday, April 11, 5:00pm
Nau Hall 211



Ancient History talk/seminar
Cedric Brelaz, University of Strasbourg and the Center for Hellenic Studies
"Democracy and Civic Participation in Greek Cities under Roman Imperial Rule: Political Practice and Culture in the Post-Classical Period"
Friday, April 8,  4:00pm 
Nau Hall 342

background reading available HERE.
 



Method and the Middle English Text
Graduate Conference
April 8-9
Full Schedule available HERE.
More information about the Conference HERE.





Wheedon Lecture:
Lukas Nickel, Reader in Chinese Art History and Archaeology, School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London
"The First Emperor of China and the Wider World: Evidence for Cross-Asian Communication in the 3rd Century BC"
Thursday, April 7, 6:00 pm
Campbell 153

The 3rd century BC saw a dramatic change in the political and cultural landscape of China. The rulers of the state of Qin joined all East Asian polities into an empire that set the foundations of China as we know it today. Nickel explores how the First Emperor of Qin (259-210 BC) utilised indigenous and alien traditions to create and consolidate this vast state. Although many aspects of his actions followed local practices established long before the emperor’s lifetime, some characteristics of the public presentation of the empire cannot easily be associated with Qin or other East Asian traditions, and point instead towards cross-Asian inspiration. Nickel places Qin dynasty material culture into this wider pan-Asian context.



Archaeological Institute of America Lecture Series
Colleen Manassa Darnell, Yale University
"The Shape of Things Already Come: 3-D Imaging in a Late Roman Desert Settlement"
Thursday, April 7, 5:30pm
Campbell 160 
 



PreModerns Meeting
Thursday, April 7, 3:30-5:00pm
Fiske Kimball Fine Arts Library ScanLab
refreshments provided

The topic of the meeting that afternoon will be devoted to: 1) discussion of D. Frankfurter’s article, ‘Martyrology and the Prurient Gaze’ in advance of his seminar on the subject on April 12 and 2) collecting our thoughts on the next academic year’s activities for the Premoderns.



 Three Day Scholar in Residence
Tessa Rajak, Professor Emerita of the University of Reading
Lecture: "How Josephus The Jew Shaped Christianity"
Friday, April 1, 5:00pm
Minor Hall 125

Flavius Josephus started life as a prominent priest in Jerusalem under the Romans. He participated in the great Jewish revolt of 66-73 CE against Roman rule, but he also opposed it. He witnessed the fall of the Jerusalem Temple and the destruction of his home city. He gained imperial patronage and ended his life in Rome. In his Jewish War, Antiquities, and Against Apion, all written in Greek, Josephus also documented the Jewish communities in the land of Israel and in the diaspora within the Roman imperial context; he retold biblical history from Genesis to his own day; and he ended up defending Judaism against its critics. Though many Jews deemed him a traitor, his conviction that God had deserted the Jews contributed to the theology of the early Church. The paragraph about Jesus Christ found in all the manuscripts of the Antiquities particularly endeared him to the early Christians. Josephus’s importance to the Christian world through the centuries will be the main subject of this lecture.

Tessa Rajak, an expert in the social and cultural history of the Jews in Hellenistic and Roman periods and early Christianity, will offer a 3-day scholar in residence at UVA, March 30-April 2, 2016. She is a professor emerita of ancient history at the University of Reading in the United Kingdom, where she taught ancient history, and a senior research fellow at Somerville College, Oxford. Her publications include The Jewish Dialogue with Greece and Rome: Studies in Cultural and Social InteractionJosephus: the Historian and His Society; and Translation and Survival: The Greek Bible and the Ancient Jewish Diaspora. Rajak received her B.A. and Ph.D. from Oxford University. During her residency, Prof. Rajak will offer a public lecture and a seminar on the general theme social contexts of scriptural transmission.



Stephen Heyworth, University of Oxford
"The End of Ovid's March"
Thursday, March 31, 5:00pm
Cocke Hall, Gibson Room



 
Three Day Scholar in Residence
Tessa Rajak, Professor Emerita of the University of Reading
Colloquium: “Mothers as Martyrs: The Maccabaean Mother among Jews and Christians” 
Wednesday, March 30, 5:00pm
Gibson Room, Cocke Hall
light reception to follow

Why does a mother make a particularly good martyr? Why and to whom are martyr-mothers useful? I shall consider these questions in the light of the changing traditions about the Maccabaean martyrs, the aged Eleazar, a mother and her seven sons. Their deaths formed part of the Jewish resistance against the religious persecution of the Seleucid King Antiochus IV in the second century BCE. The tradition about these martyrs was enshrined in the Second and Fourth Books of the Maccabees, which were soon adopted and treasured by the Christian Church. I argue that from a very early stage, commemoration of the mother in particular, and the martyrs together, was a cross-cultural phenomenon, involving Jews, Christians, and pagan Greeks too, in the great Syrian city of Antioch.



Archaeological Institute of America Lecture
Darlene L. Brooks Hedstrom, Wittenberg University
"Archaeology of Monastic Communities in Late Antique Egypt"
Tuesday, March 29, 5:30 pm
Campbell 160



Classical Association of the Middle West and South
March 16-19, 2016
Williamsburg, VA



10th Annual Elizabeth Frances Jones Lecture in Classical Studies
Michael Danti, Boston University & American Schools of Oriental Research
“Iconoclasm, Pillage, and Plunder: The Cultural Heritage Crisis in Syria and Iraq”
Wednesday, March 16, 1:00 pm
Gaines Theatre (Freeman Center)
reception to follow

 
Scholars' Lab
Sarah Bond, University of Virginia
"Linking the Ancient World: Pleiades Workshop with Sarah Bond"
Tuesday, March 15, 10:00 am
Alderman 421

At this workshop, Associate editor Sarah Bond will introduce the Pleiades community to participants. She will walk them through the history and layout of the gazetteer, discuss the popular contribution and review of our linked geodata, and then help participants make a map of sites within the ancient Mediterranean. Persons at all levels of experience (from "interested" to "expert") are welcome to participate.




 Fotini Kondyli, University of Virginia
"Living with the Dead: Sacred Geographies of Memory and Belonging in Byzantine Athens" 
Thursday, February 25, 2:00-3:15 pm
New Cabell 332.



Tuesday Classics Luncheon
Tuesday, February 23, lunch at 12:30, talk at 1:00, and adjournment at 1:45
Room E1 of the Garden Room


 

 
Obear Chair candidate campus visit
Kathryn Morgan, University of California Los Angeles
"Kings and Generals: Simonides and the Diplomacy of Victory"
Thursday, February 18, 5:00pm
Gibson Room, Cocke Hall
        



Tuesday Classics Luncheon
Tuesday, February 16, lunch at 12:30, talk at 1:00, and adjournment at 1:45
Room E1 of the Garden Room



 
 
Obear Chair candidate campus visit
Bill Allan, University College, Oxford
"Solon and the Rhetoric of stasis"
Thursday, February 11, 5:00pm
Gibson Room, Cocke Hall




Tuesday Classics Luncheon
Tuesday, February 9, lunch at 12:30, talk at 1:00, and adjournment at 1:45
Room E1 of the Garden Room



   
Obear Chair candidate campus visit
Ivana Petrovic, Durham University
"Royal Gods and Divine Kingship in Hellenistic Poetry"
Thursday, February 4, 5:00pm
Gibson Room, Cocke Hall




Tuesday Classics Luncheon
Ted Lendon, UVA
Tuesday, February 2, lunch at 12:30, talk at 1:00, and adjournment at 1:45
Room E1 of the Garden Room



Archaeology Brown Bag 
Sophie Crawford Waters, University of Pennsylvania
"Context and Connectivity: Rethinking Italic Architectural Terracottas (3rd-1st cent. BCE)."
Friday, Jan. 29, 4:00pm
Brooks Hall Conference Room



Archaeology Brown Bag
Jacqueline Huwyler, University of Virginia
'Frontier Foodways: Inter-Cultural Interactions and Ethnic Identity at 12th- and 13th-Dynasty Egyptian Fortresses in Nubia'
Friday, Nov. 20, 4:00pm
Fayerweather 215
Light refreshments provided


 
 
Friends of Classics Lecture
Ted Lendon, University of Virginia 
"Ancient Greek Combat: What can Modern Riots Tell us?"
Thursday, Nov. 19, 5:00pm
Rouss 403 
Reception to follow



Workshop on Religion and Society in Greco-Roman Antiquity
Christopher Faraone, University of Chicago
[seminar] "Ancient Greek Amulets: Protection, Healing, and the Acquisition of Abstract Benefits"
Thursday, Nov. 12, 12:30-2:00pm
Newcomb 389

Download the readings for this seminar HERE and HERE (two papers).

email cjw9bs@virginia.edu to RSVP for provided lunch
 


 

Workshop on Religion and Society in Greco-Roman Antiquity
Christopher Faraone, University of Chicago
"Ancient Greek Magic, Domestic Religion and the Rituals of Women: Connecting the Dots"
Wednesday, Nov. 11, 5pm
Rouss 403



 Archaeological Institute of America Kress Lecture Series
Lorenzo Nigro, La Sapienza University, Rome
"Stars sparkling on the waters: The Temple of Baal 'Addir/Poseidon at Motya and the History of the Mediterranean"
Sunday, November 8, 5:30pm
Campbell 160




Premoderns Meeting
"We're Getting the Band Back Together"
Thursday, November 5, 5:00 - 7:00pm
Fiske Kimball Fine Arts Library

Yes, we are all back.  Given our impressive new website, the founders of the preModerns@ UVA thought this week was a good time to bring all our friends and colleagues together to discuss where we are headed.  Many of the new initiatives at UVA bespeak of possibilities for the preModerns.  We plan to have discussion on the website, our meeting schedule this year, and proposals for funding more collaborative endeavours.  There will also be food and drink.

John Miller, of Classics fame, has suggested a little light ready for this first meeting.  Two articles by Chris Faroane will be the discussion point. The readings have been linked to the event announcement HERE.



Medieval Studies Program Lecture
Tariq Jaffer, Amherst College
"A Thematic Approach to Covenant Theology in Islam"
Monday, November 2, 12:30pm
Nau 342

The idea of a covenant or contractual relationship between God and human beings is a historical theme that Islam shares with other cultural and religious traditions that emerged in the Ancient Near East and that later emerged in the Reformed tradition of Christianity. This lecture focuses on the history of the idea of covenant in the Qur'an and on the debates surrounding it in Islamic theology and exegesis. It adopts a thematic approach, and it attempts to show how the seed of the idea of covenant became enmeshed in a complex web of controversies. By analyzing such controversies, this lecture identifies several concepts that reveal distinguishign features that set off Islam from other cultural and religious traditions. 

Speaker: Tariq Jaffer received his secondary education at Upper Canada College and his undergraduate degree at the University of Toronto. He then spent two and a half years at McGill University (Montreal, Quebec), where he undertook coursework in Islamic Studies, including classical Arabic and Persian. From McGill he went on to pursue his Ph.D in Religious Studies at Yale University, where he studied the Qurʾān and Qurʾānic commentaries, Islamic theology, Aristotle and medieval philosophy, classical Arabic poetry, Persian (Middle and Modern), and Islamic Mysticism. Tariq joined the Religion Department at Amherst College in 2008.




Alumni Lecture
Chris Nappa, University of Minnesota
 

"Catullus Confidential: Prurience and the Art of Misreading”
Friday, Oct. 30, 5:00pm
Gibson Room

Christopher Nappa is Associate Professor in the Department of  Classical and Near Eastern Studies at the University of Minnesota, where he has also served as Chair of Department and won a graduate teaching award. He received his PhD here at the University of Virginia in 1996, with a dissertation on Catullus.   His interests include Latin Poetry, gender and sexuality in antiquity, and Satire.  He has published on Virgil, Catullus, and Juvenal.




Tuesday Classics Luncheon - Finale of the Fall
Tuesday, Oct. 27, lunch at 12:30, talk at 1:00, and adjournment at 1:45
Room E1 of the Garden Room



 
Julian Weiss, King’s College London
“Josephus in Early Modern Spain: 1492 and the Death and Life of Jews,” 
Monday, October 26, 3:00pm
New Cabell Hall 236.

Julian Weiss is Professor of Medieval and Early Modern Spanish Studies at King’s College London. He is the author of The Poet's Art: Literary Theory in Castile, c. 1400-60 (1990) and The ‘Mester de clerecía’: Intellectuals and Ideologies in Thirteenth-Century Castile (2006). He has also edited or co-edited several volumes of essays and published numerous essays on medieval and early modern poetry, reading and censorship, and gender and sanctity.

This talk is sponsored by Jewish Studies, the Department of Spanish, Italian, and Portuguese, and the Corcoran Department of History Early Modern Study Group.




  Tuesday Classics Luncheon
Tuesday, Oct. 20, lunch at 12:30, talk at 1:00, and adjournment at 1:45
Room E1 of the Garden Room


 
Constantine Lecture
Donald Mastronarde, 
University of California Berkeley
"The Euripidean Scholia and Educational Practices in Antiquity and Byzantium"
Monday, Oct. 19, 5:00pm
Rouss 403
 



  Tuesday Classics Luncheon
Tuesday, Oct. 13, lunch at 12:30, talk at 1:00, and adjournment at 1:45
Room E1 of the Garden Room



 Classics Undergraduate Lecture
Lily Panoussi, William and Mary
"Cougars in Rome?  Older Women, Younger Men in Roman Literature"
Friday, Oct. 9, 5:00pm
Rouss Hall room 403
Reception to follow

The Department of Classics is very pleased to welcome Professor Vassiliki Panoussi, recently awarded the 2015 Plumeri Award for Faculty Excellence at the College of William and Mary.  Professor Panoussi's research focuses on Latin Literature and women and gender in antiquity.



 
Charles Stanish,
UCLA Cotsen Institute
"Foundations of Andean State Formation"
Friday, Oct. 9, 1pm
Brooks Hall 2nd floor conference room
Reception to follow



 Archaeological Institute of America Lecture Series
Malcolm Bell III, Professor Emeritus of University of Virginia
"A Sicillian Greek Agora"
Wednesday, September 30, 5:30pm
Campbell 158
Reception to follow

The Charlottesville Society of the Archaeological Institute of America was founded 50 years ago and held its first lecture on October 15, 1965.  The September 30th lecture will celebrate the founding and the first lecture.  

The Art Department played a role in the founding of the C’ville AIA Society in that David Lawall, then on the Art Department faculty, was one of the founding members, as was his wife, Willa.  (David is now retired having been director of the Museum some time ago).  Willa Lawall still attends every AIA lecture and will make a few brief remarks about the founding.

This occassion is, however, a triple celebration!  2015 is the 60th anniversary of the Morgantina Excavations!  The last 35 of those years have been associated with the University of Virginia, with Malcolm Bell as Director, a cause for celebration in its own right.  

Professor Bell is this year's Norton Lecturer for the AIA.  The Norton Lectureship is one of the three most distinguished lectureships within the AIA (including the Joukowski and the Kress).  

In addition, at the January 2016 General Meeting, the AIA will award its Gold Medal for Distinguished Archaeological Achievement to Malcolm Bell.
 



  Tuesday Classics Luncheon
Tuesday, Sept. 29, lunch at 12:30, talk at 1:00, and adjournment at 1:45
Room E1 of the Garden Room



Tuesday Classics Luncheon
Mary Lefkowitz, Professor Emerita of Wellesley College
Tuesday, September 22nd, lunch at 12:30, talk at 1:00, and adjournment at 1:45.
Cocke Hall, Gibson Room




 
Mary Lefkowitz, Professor Emerita of Wellesley College
"Why We Can't Understand Greek Drama"
Monday, September 21, 5:00pm
Rouss 403
Reception to follow

Mary Lefkowitz, whose career at Wellesley College was distinguished by many important books, has added to our debt to her by writing about the gods in Euripidean tragedy. Having shown earlier that there is no presumptive reason to trust what later antiquity says about Euripides' views about anything, she has shown that reading the text of the plays without presuppositions derived from the untrustworthy biographical tradition gives us a Euripides who presents the gods pretty much as they are presented in serious poetry elsewhere. There is no reason to regard him as issuing a challenge to received views and much reason to see his presentation as belonging within the roomy fabric of archaic and classical views of the operation of the divine within the world.

 
Workshop on Religion and Society in Greco-Roman Antiquity 

James Rives, University of North Carolina
Seminar: ‘Animal Sacrifice and Political Identity in Rome and Judaea’ 
Friday, September 18, 3:00-4:30 pm
Cocke Hall, Gibson Room 
The seminar will discuss the attached recent paper by Prof. Rives. All are welcome to attend.
Download the reading for this seminar HERE.

Prof. Rives will give a seminar 3–4:30 on a recent paper of his.
An event of the Workshop of Religion and Society in Greco-Roman Antiquity. Sponsored by the Departments of Art, Classics, History, and Religious Studies, with the generous support of the Page-Barbour Fund.
 



 


Workshop on Religion and Society in Greco-Roman Antiquity
James Rives, University of North Carolina
Lecture: 'Social Power and Religious Communication in the Roman Empire: Orthopraxy and Orthodoxy'
Thursday, September 17, 5:00 pm
Cocke Hall, Gibson Room